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IAPB’s Global Assembly 2020 was due to be held in Singapore this October. As a result of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the Board has decided to postpone Global Assembly to October 2021.
Postponement Announcement

 

The GA2020 Programme

The Programme features 3 streams; Excellence, Sustainability & the Western Pacific

 

Programme Overview

Filter Schedule

Programme Stream

Excellence
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VLEG 2020 Data, Projections & Trends & Vision Atlas Launch
Convenor: Rupert Bourne
  • Sessions
  • Excellence
Diabetic Retinopathy: An Integrated People-Centred Eye Care Approach
Convenor: Gillian Gibbs
  • Excellence
  • Session sponsored by Lions Clubs International Foundation

Diabetes is one of the major health and development challenges of the 21st century, and every person living with diabetes is at risk of developing diabetic retinopathy (DR). The World Health Organization’s approach to integrated people-centred eye care (IPCEC) can help address the significant eye care challenges that many countries face. This interactive panel discussion will address challenges and opportunities in developing, implementing, and monitoring effective DR programs within the framework and strategies of achieving integrated people-centred eye care (IPCEC).

We will share lessons learned and key recommendations on implementing integrated care for diabetes and eye health.

Session Outcomes:

1. Identify barriers and strategies for engagement and empowerment of people and communities in DR care
2. Describe best practices for reorienting the model of care and incorporating DR care coordination into primary health care
3. Examine methods for coordinating services within and across sectors to implement effective and sustainable DR programs
4. Learn models for creating an enabling environment for DR service provision and care.

Uncorrected Refractive Errors
Convenor: Sandra Block
  • Excellence

This session explores the social impact and considers approaches to address the most common cause of distance and near vision impairment, uncorrected refractive error.

This session will focus on unpacking the World Report on Vision provoking data on the magnitude of uncorrected refractive error (URE) and suggested approaches to eliminate vision impairment due to URE.  We are all asking how have the numbers changed so quickly?   We will explore the definitions and data sources to understand the numbers. We will discuss how can we address the problem from a population health and development perspective? We will consider The World Report on Vision recommendations of integrated people centred eye care as well as empowering people and communities. We will discuss the HR required to meet the need – is it realistic to think that in the next 30 years we can ever have the amount of HR we need?

Session Outcomes:

1. Consider the implications of screening vs full examination, both for children and presbyopic adults and where do campaigns fit in this?
2. What level of quality should we as a sector be pushing them to target?
3. What are the implications of the competency based approach recommended by the WHO.
4. The session will work towards the beginning of sector recommendations on approaches to URE in light of the world report on vision.

The role of Low Vision Services in Inclusive Eye Health
Convenor: Babar Qureshi
  • Sponsored Sessions
  • Excellence
  • Session sponsored by CBM

This session will provide participants with clear strategies and practical steps of how to integrate low vision services into eye health programmes. This will improve access to services and empower people with permanent vision loss to access wider opportunities.

The WHO World Report on Vision recently re-emphasised the importance of low vision and rehabilitation for everyday functioning of patients with vision impairment that cannot be prevented or treated. The aim of this session is to increase participants’ insight into the essential part that vision rehabilitation/low vision services play in ensuring access to and inclusion in eye health for all people, including under-served populations such as poor people, women, migrants, indigenous people, people with disabilities and rural communities.

Session Outcomes:

1. Introduction to inclusive eye health services
2. Strategies and practices of utilising comprehensive low vision care to:

  • – Strengthen accessibility and inclusiveness of eye care services for people from all disability groups, including those with vision impairment.
  • – See people with permanent vision loss empowered to access appropriate mobility, living skills, education, rehabilitation, livelihood and social opportunities
  • – Support people with disabilities and vision problems, especially those with intellectual impairment, and empower them to use their best possible vision

3. Practical steps of how to integrate low vision services into eye health programmes at the district level.

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Equity
Child Blindness Initiative – Saving sight for a lifetime!
Convenor: Victoria M Sheffield
  • Sponsored Sessions
  • Excellence
  • Session sponsored by Integrative Sciences, LLC & International Eye Foundation

Global eye health leaders discuss addressing common causes of childhood blindness through advocacy, partnerships, training research and innovation.

This session will highlight learnings and impact from sentinel childhood blindness projects. Projects presented will focus on URE screening and spectacle provision; blinding diseases such as ROP, DR in children, cataract, and glaucoma; low vision care and integration; training; advocacy and partnerships; and operational research and innovation that add to the global knowledge base.

Session Outcomes:

Attendees will learn about:
1. Projects that focus on improving access to and quality of eye health services for children
2. Low vision care
3. Advocacy and partnerships
4. Operational research and innovation.

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Diversity
  • Partnerships
Glaucoma: Break the silence – tackling the thief of sight together!
Convenor: Jess Blijkers
  • Sponsored Sessions
  • Excellence
  • Session sponsored by Light for the World

How can we avoid people losing their sight irreversibly due to Glaucoma? The challenge is certainly immense but solutions exist! We will raise awareness and foster exchange on glaucoma as part of Universal Eye Health.

The complex reality of health systems and development cooperation has led to glaucoma not being addressed with the attention the world’s leading cause of irreversible blindness requires.
As eye health organisations who aspire to work comprehensively towards SDG3 and universal health care, and put people in the centre, we must develop more systematic answers to a problem for which technical solutions exist: because glaucoma blindness is avoidable.

This session will explore existing initiatives and good practices, alliance building and programmatic approaches to help fight glaucoma blindness in low-income countries effectively. In this session we also want to get a feeling from participants on the value and potential purpose of a IAPB Working Group on Glaucoma.

Session Outcomes:

1. Learn about what is already happening in the area of Glaucoma and share ideas and experience from your own programmes;
2. Recognise the crucial importance of tackling glaucoma as part of Universal Eye health;
3. Build alliances and partnerships with organisations active in this area;
4. Explore potential for more collaboration on Glaucoma in an IAPB Working Group.

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Equity
  • Partnerships
Celebrating Achievements in Trachoma & Onchocerciasis Programmes
Convenor: TBC
  • Excellence

Significant progress towards the elimination of Trachoma & Onchocerciasis has been made over the last 20 years. The achievements will be celebrated, gaps identified and challenges for the future will be discussed. Lessons will be shared that may be applicable to other areas of eye care.

Access to Drugs, Medical Devices & Vision Treatment
Convenor: Alan Robin
  • Excellence

This session in an opportunity to discuss challenges and opportunities in providing access to medical devices such as low vision aids, imaging and diagnostics, and drugs for treatment of chronic conditions such as glaucoma or CNV. New technologies and innovatives approaches will be indeed of particular interest to participants.

Everyone’s talking about Integrated Health Care – but what is it? Come find out.
Convenor: Heather Machin
  • Excellence

We all talk about the need for eye care to integrate into general health care, but what does that actually mean, and what does that look like for those on the ground developing their services and systems? This session will provide delegates with the foundation blocks, they need, in order to consider how they may integrate eye care into general healthcare. The session will outline how eye care can support and leverage from other areas of health service, and vice versa. It will encourage, that by working in partnership, and leveraging from other areas of healthcare, we can maximise resources. Ultimately, it will demonstrate that by taking a coordinated, holistic, person-centric approach to our work, we can support a person’s healthcare needs at the multiple entry and exit points to services, throughout the duration of a person’s life.

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Advocacy
  • Partnerships
Launch of the Lancet Global Health Commission on Global Eye Health and the Vision Atlas
Convenor: Matthew Burton and Hannah Faal
  • Excellence

The Commission on Global Eye Health will examine the current situation in low, middle and high-income settings, projected burden, the economic case for action, and a range of forward-looking strategies to address global eye health needs over the next 20-30 years. The new version of the Vision Atlas will be launched with the latest data from the Commission, Vision Loss Expert Group, Global Action Plan indicators and the World Report on Vision on a new and improved digital platform.

Don’t let a high risk patient you have seen lose vision!
Convenor: David Friedman
  • Excellence

This session will review which patients are in need of urgent or semi-urgent care and provide guidance on best practices.

In this session we will hear from global experts on a range of major eye diseases that we all see and we will discuss when urgent care is needed. The topics will include diabetic retinopathy, macular disease, vein and artery occlusions, paediatric cases, and glaucoma.

We will provide information on best practices for determining which patients are at high risk and how to care for them appropriately. Strategies for successful implementation of care will also be discussed.

Session Outcomes:

1. To understand which individuals with diabetic retinopathy require urgent care and to provide approaches to enable that care to be delivered.
2. To highlight the fact that some with glaucoma are at imminent risk of vision loss, while others are less at risk and can be monitored differently. To provide data from systems in place to prevent patient loss to follow-up especially for high risk patients.
3. To review the needs of paediatric patients and techniques to insure adequate care is provided.

Themes
  • Equity
  • Quality
  • Technology
Building a data-orientated culture. Data – hassle or resource?
Convenor: Suzanne Gilbert
  • Sponsored Sessions
  • Excellence

Creating a culture of evidence-based decision making within your organisation.

Few organisations have well-articulated goals and processes to promote evidence-based decision making. Come to this session for cases on time-tested strategies to develop a data-friendly culture and improved impact.

Eye programmes generate an enormous amount of data, yet rarely benefit from the use of the information. In instances where data gets used at hospital or national level, either for addressing a challenge or design of services, the impact has been significant. This interactive session focuses on case examples from programmes actively grappling with how to: use data to continually improve service utilisation, efficiency, equity, and quality; build the culture and systems for evidence driven management and design of services; and invest in development of operational research skills so that eye hospital teams can ask and answer their own questions.

Session Outcomes:

Participants will
1. Learn to improve use of existing data
2. Find out about skills, processes and strategies used to create data leadership and evidence driven management
3. Understand the steps for building in-house operations research capacity.

 

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Advocacy
  • Equity
  • Partnerships
  • Technology
Patient Outcomes: Driving improvement through monitoring
Convenor: RD Ravindran
  • Sessions
  • Excellence

We are in the service of restoring sight to our patients. Gaining patient’s trust is important for the uptake of services and good treatment outcomes are fundamental to this – both to restore sight and spur demand. Put your organisation on a path of continuous improvement and growth. Learn about the different dimensions of Patient Outcomes and ways to implement the change process at institutional and national levels.

This session will include presentations and discussion on the following topics:
Patient Safety in Eye Care
Cataract Surgery Quality Assurance
Driving quality at the national level
Using EMR to enhance quality
Cataract Surgery Outcomes
National Registry for Eye Care
Measuring Patient Experience
Panel Discussion – Effective practices in health care

Session Outcomes:

We will explore evidence-based quality improvement practices and learn from bench-marking performance to meet the following outcomes:
1. A holistic understanding of quality
2. Practical tools for measuring patient outcomes
3. Continuous improvement practices

Themes
  • Equity
  • Quality
  • Technology
Sustainability
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Eye Care Galvanizing Social Change
Convenor: Sumrana Yasmin
  • Sustainability

Let’s develop a greater understanding of the determinants of eye health and social change. Let’s discuss the societal-level factors that influence eye health policies and practices. Let’s be innovative and a catalyst for social change!

The World Report on Vision provides an opportunity for us to re-affirm our commitment to ‘a world in which nobody is needlessly visually impaired, where those with unavoidable vision loss can achieve their full potential, and where there is universal access to comprehensive eye care services’. Agenda2030, including the Sustainable Development Goals, also has a significant focus on, ‘Leaving no-one Behind’. With this in mind, the session will explore the changing dynamics and innovative approaches that lead to improving the equity in eye care and promote social change. The session will focus primarily on eye health while seeking to draw lessons, conclusions and recommendations from across the health, education and development sectors. In considering marginalisation broadly, factors to be considered will include: disability, gender, poverty, and the intersection of these factors.

Session Outcomes:

1. Main causes of marginalisation and exclusion, resulting from vision impairment and other factors, are understood.
2. Barriers to inclusive eye care and ways to reduce them, in different contexts, will be described.
3. Importance of understanding, measuring and communicating impact and social change is realised.

Themes
  • Advocacy
  • Equity
  • Partnerships
The future of eye care: a WHO perspective
Convenor: Stuart Keel
  • Sustainability

This session will provide an update on the work of WHO to support Member States in the implementation of the recommendations of the World Report on Vision.

This objective of this session is to provide an overview of the strategic directions of the WHO Vision Programme and an update on the technical tools, such as the Package of Eye Care Interventions and the Eye Health Competency Framework, that WHO is developing to support Member States in the implementation of the recommendations of the World Report on Vision. The session will also discuss opportunities and strategies to effectively integrate eye care into the health system within the region. A panel discussion will be held at the conclusion of the session where the audience will have the opportunity to ask questions to the speakers.

Session Outcomes:

1. Improved knowledge of strategic direction of WHO,
2. Greater understanding of the World report on vision recommendations,
3. Awareness of new WHO tools and how they can be implemented a country level

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Equity
  • Partnerships
Closing the Gender Equity Gap in Eye Health
Convenor: Carly Iles
  • Sustainability

How do we close the gender gap in eye health? Join us as we review the latest data on gender equity and eye health and discuss how the sector can address the gender gap together.

Utilising the latest data from the Lancet Commission Report, an expert panel will examine the current state of the gender gap in eye health, gender budgeting and why it’s important and how the sector is progressing in its attempt to embed gender equity inside organisations. Participants will be asked to answer what they believe is the most critical element in addressing the gender gap and suggestions for how the sector can move forward. This data will be used to develop a framework to guide the IAPB Gender Equity working group’s next steps in addressing gender inequity in eye health.

Session Outcomes:

Participants will develop an understanding of:
1. IAPB member status of gender equity in their organisations
2. Gender budgeting and why it is important
3.Current data, trends on eye health and gender equity and the increasing gap IAPB will use the results of sector engagement to develop a framework of how to close the gap on gender equity in eye health.

Closing the Vision Care Gap for Good – Partnering for Sustainable Change
Convenor: K-T Overbey
  • Sponsored Sessions
  • Sustainability
  • Session sponsored by OneSight

How do you transition from providing temporary aid to creating reliable, scalable vision care access for the long term? Global leaders and partner organisations discuss what has worked, what hasn’t, and what the future holds.

The key to universal vision care is in finding pathways to move from temporary programming to creating long-term access that meets the needs of communities, cities, and even whole countries. What makes sustainable change not just possible but also successful? Here’s a hint: working collaboratively with the right partners is essential. Come hear from our partners and leading organisations as we share what we’ve learned, what works where, and how to get started today.

Session Outcomes:

1. Connect people with synergistic capabilities
2. Sustainable programming requires executing different models/ interventions
3. Understand the breadth of partnerships needed to successfully address URE permanently
4. Knowledge of where partner organisations are actively involved and where we can head together.

 

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Partnerships
  • Technology
PitchNOW
Convenor: Rengaraj Venkatesh and Tin Aung
  • Sustainability

PitchNOW session in style of Technology Shark Tank, focusing on Programme Sustainability and Sustainable Development Practice.

Themes
  • Technology
Achieving Financial Sustainability & the Reduction of the Carbon Footprint – let’s make this happen!
Convenor: Thulasiraj Ravilla
  • Sustainability

Ongoing eye care to the community, especially to those who can’t afford, doesn’t need to be subject to the vagaries of external donations. There is a goldmine of untapped financial resources within each eye hospital – learn to realise it for the good of your hospital and the community that you serve.

Financial resources are essential for every activity, both to get things going (investment) and to keep things going (cash-flow). Even in settings where services are provided for free as a policy or philosophy, this notion of financial sustainability holds good as somebody is paying for the expenses. On one hand, it is all about ensuring that there is adequate fund flow to meet the expenses while on the other hand ensuring that whatever is spent is done optimally and without waste. This session will comprehensively explore how revenues can be augmented without diluting the social commitment and revenue needs minimised by eliminating waste and cost optimisation. This outlook will span the patients as well as the providers. The session will also share how financial sustainability and reduction of carbon footprint can go hand-in-hand.

Session Outcomes:

1. Get a balanced perspective of Financial Sustainability, how it can be achieved through right design and processes
2. Recognise how “Financial Sustainability” perspective can actually also drive quality, efficiency, demand and inclusive care
3. Get practical ideas of achieving financial sustainability, serving the community and reducing carbon foot print.

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Equity
Eye health financing for eye health inclusive Universal Health Coverage – taking practical advantage of current policy opportunities
Convenor: Debbie Muirhead
  • Sustainability

How can we, as eye health organisations and professionals, practically use and contribute to current opportunities in health financing for eye care? Ways eye care is covered, or not, in national health schemes, how services are paid for and who pays what cost, can drastically influence who accesses them and their risk of financial hardship – key elements of universal health coverage. Eye care has often been neglected in past health financing for Universal Health Coverage (UHC) discourse but as we increasingly engage with these issues we will discuss how we can consider them in our organisations and activities including hearing from those influencing and making financing for UHC decisions.

Health financing is a core part of accelerating progress toward universal health coverage – a key goal and focus of many national governments and global health agencies. This session will look at three areas of health financing getting high attention in countries and globally currently.
1. Strategic purchasing – using health financing to improve efficiency, quality and equity in eye health
2. Financial protection – examining and minimising cost burdens and barriers to eye health care
3. Sustainable financing – beyond the jargon to practical evidence, sources and implications in eye health
We will discuss the practical opportunities these provide for the eye health community to demonstrate the importance of eye health to decision makers and to conduct activities that take advantage of these key areas of health financing to progress eye health inclusive universal health coverage.

Session Outcomes:

At the end of the session participants should:
1. Understand what approaches to strategic purchasing your organisation or profession could most use or leverage for improved eye health service provision
2. Know when to assess financial protection in relation to eye health service access and what approaches can be used for what purposes
3. Have key ideas on what cost and value of eye health information might be most useful to influence the amount, type and use of resources in the eye health sector in their setting
4. Have some practical actions relevant to their role or organisation that can take advantage of key policy windows in health financing to gain focus on and improve eye health.

 

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Advocacy
  • Equity
Providing for Patients and the Planet: Environmental Sustainability and Eye Health
Convenor: Cassandra Thiel
  • Sustainability

This session is an opportunity to inspire, equip and connect eye health professionals with the know-how to consciously design environmentally friendly eye care services that provide excellent patient care and protect the health of the environment.

This session will educate and provide resources for achieving environmental sustainability in all aspects of eye care services. The first segment will provide background and motivation for achieving environmental sustainability (ES). The second segment will give individuals opportunities to review real case studies in implementing ES in eye care services in both high- and low and middle-income settings, and discuss their own approaches in small groups. Case studies will focus on a broad range of topics, from optimising care pathways and committing to renewable energy, to achieving a sustainable procurement and sourcing strategy and properly managing clinical wastes.

Session Outcomes:

1. Learn the basic concepts of environmental sustainability and how they relate to costs and quality
2. Explore case studies from other eye organisations trying to achieve environmental sustainability in their operations and policies
3. Connect with experts and like-minded colleagues to develop your own strategies for improving environmental footprint of your eye care practice or organisation.

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Advocacy
  • Diversity
  • Equity
  • Partnerships
  • Technology
Western Pacific
Expand All +
Myopia – a public health perspective. Addressing Tomorrow’s Health Crisis, Today
Convenor: Amanda Davis
  • Western Pacific

By 2050 half the word will be myopic with one billion at risk of going blind from high-myopia. How do we use the current evidence to determine the public health interventions required now to prevent this looming crisis?

The increased incidence of myopia and the increased risk of high myopia are the emergent issues in our sector. The biggest challenge is in the lack of knowledge or level of importance that is being placed on it. Public health policy and interventions are not in place to reduce onset age and minimise progression to reduce risk of high myopia and its complications. In 2015 WHO declared “The prevalence of myopia and high myopia are increasing globally at an alarming rate”. In 2018, a Western Pacific Region WHO myopia meeting report urged member states to “Address myopia as a public health issue, with high myopia given even higher priority”. This session will review current evidence, discuss the future impact of myopia and create a shared vision for how to tackle this issue as a sector.

Session Outcomes:

Attendees will:
1. Understand the evidence and impact of myopia
2. Agree on the need to have a sector approach to advocacy for policy change
3. Will establish the next steps required to identify the change we want to see
4. Develop a framework for broader sector engagement on this issue.

Themes
  • Advocacy
  • Behaviour change
  • Environment
  • Technology
China 2: TBC
Convenor: TBC
  • Western Pacific
Seeing Beyond Difficult: Best-practice service delivery with examples from the Western Pacific
Convenor: Komal Ram
  • Western Pacific

The session aims to explore how to view difficulties as opportunities to maximise service delivery in the Western Pacific Region.

Blindness and vision impairment are serious life-limiting issues that require immediate multilateral action to prevent or mitigate their impacts. This is particularly true in under-served communities in the Western Pacific region which live in remote, rural areas with a lack of transport infrastructure; an acute shortage of trained eye care professionals and clinics; and in some cases, recurrent law and order problems. While there is no question that these challenges in the Western Pacific region make eye care service delivery fraught with difficulty, this session promotes an optimistic view of eye care service delivery in the Western Pacific context.

Session Outcomes:

Participants will gain an understanding of how to co-design and implement eye care programmes that are:
1. Accessible, reach under-served communities and strengthen service delivery.
2. Sustainable, integrated within existing health care systems, locally-owned, and sensitive to natural environmental conditions.
3. Cost–Effective, affordable, can be locally managed in the long-term and offer a high ROI in terms of health outcomes.

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Partnerships
  • Technology
Implementing the World report on vision in the Western Pacific – the ‘what’ and the ‘how’
Convenor: Andreas Mueller
  • Western Pacific

The World report on vision provides a road map for countries to increase the scope and impact of delivering quality eye care. This session will review action priorities and approaches for Asian and Pacific Island countries in the region, offering the opportunity for NGO, industry and academic partners to strengthen engagement and collaboration on the ground.

Countries in the Western Pacific region cover a broad range of development stages, requiring different approaches to create change. At the same time, lack of integration of eye care services into health systems and the need for stronger primary care are common realities. The World report on vision provides a road map for countries to increase the scope and impact of delivering quality eye care. This session will review action priorities and approaches for Asian and Pacific Island countries in the region, offering the opportunity for NGO, industry and academic partners to strengthen engagement and collaboration on the ground.

Session Outcomes:

The ‘what’
1. Country representatives will learn from each other about high impact priority areas for implementing the World report on vision recommendations

The ‘how’
2. Attendees will gain knowledge of existing tools and guiding strategies towards implementing the World report on vision recommendations
3. Country representatives will exchange ideas with NGO, industry and academia partners about collaboration opportunities.

Themes
  • Advocacy
  • Partnerships
  • Technology
Partnerships in the Pacific – Networking with New friends and Old.
Convenor: Drew Keys
  • Western Pacific

Did you know there is a Science to Partnerships? Maybe not… and yet, here in the Western Pacific we do partnerships really well. That’s why we’re using our session to celebrate the Western Pacific region, the organisations who work here and their success: PLUS we’ll build new relationships as we forge a partnerships framework for Beyond 2020.

Regional Chair Amanda Davis, together with Marijke Fotia our resident Partnership Broker, will lead a session aimed at developing a framework for partnerships in the Western Pacific. Partnerships are a core result of Networking, so this fun and informative session will allow you time to mingle with like minded eye health professionals from the Western Pacific as well as hear from some selected panelists: what has made a successful partnership and what hasn’t! It’s a chance for those of us in the Western Pacific to share our successes and challenges from the Vision2020 period with an eye on the next decade.

Session Outcomes:

Attendees will:
1. Gain a better understanding of the science of partnerships
2. Hear what makes a good partnership and what are some of the pitfalls?
3. Develop a framework for partnerships in the region
4. Engage with a room full of new partnerships (well new connections at the very least!).

Themes
  • Diversity
  • Partnerships
China 1: Scaling Up Interventions for Myopia in China
Convenor: Zou Haidong
  • Western Pacific

This session is an opportunity to present the Shanghai model, relevance to the National Refractive Error Program and how it can be widely applied (for example working with Orbis in Ningxia).

Addressing global inequity in Indigenous and tribal peoples eye health: what lessons can be learnt from the Australian experience?
Convenor: Jaki Adams-Barton and Judith Abbott
  • Western Pacific

Leaders in Indigenous Eye Health from Australia and throughout the Western Pacific collaborate to ignite a global conversation about the inequity in eye health experienced by Indigenous and tribal peoples globally. With a population group across the world in which eye health has been largely neglected, action must be taken if we are to ‘leave no one behind’. Presenters will draw upon lessons learned from Australian efforts to close the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander eye health and about opportunities to begin addressing this inequity. These lessons can be applied to addressing the inequity in eye health faced by Indigenous and tribal populations globally and across the Western Pacific. Case studies will also be presented by colleagues from the Philippines and possibly other countries. An interactive Q&A panel will follow.

Session Outcomes:

1. Understanding why thre should b focus on Indigenous and Tribal people’s eye health globally and in the Western Pacific region.
2. Learninsg from the Australian experiences, how can we start to working with other Indigenous and tribal populations?
3. Case studies of activity already occurring in countries outside Australia.
4. Panel discussion about possible actions organisations and nations can take, including strategies for building effective partnerships; awareness of opportunities for sustainable innovation and enhancements in this area.

How can you improve the quality of eye care in your country? An eye health workforce approach.
Convenor: May Ho
  • Western Pacific

Could development of an appropriate eye health workforce improve eye care in your context? Come and learn about the models of care applied around the Western Pacific region.

The need for eye care services are on the increase – out pacing the development of the eye care workforce. What can we do to address the gap? This session will look at the different approaches that have been taken to close this gap and how it would translate in different contexts. Speakers from a variety of backgrounds providing eye care in different countries will share their experience. Topics will include integration of primary eye care into primary healthcare by introduction of a new health care cadre and models for delivery of paediatric eye care and myopia control in a teaching clinic. Novel approaches to management of chronic eye diseases such as glaucoma by using eye care teams and task shifting from specialist hospitals to community clinics will be considered. Development of diverse teams to deliver eye care in low resource settings will be discussed.

Session Outcomes:

At the end of the session participants will be able to
1. Describe eye health workforce diversity in the region
2. Discuss various models of eye care delivery to address eye care needs
3. Discuss the applicability of these models to improve the quality of eye care in their own contexts.

Themes
  • Accessibility
  • Advocacy
  • Partnerships